A Systemic Problem in Our Healthcare System

Those of you who are old enough to remember the Australian bush nurse Sister Kenny (1880-1952), will no doubt recall the brouhaha she caused within the medical establishment of her time. Elizabeth Kenny had devised a treatment for polio that was universally castigated by doctors of the day. In fact her methods proved time and again to be efficacious and became the forerunner for the practice of physical therapy as we know it today.

The reason Sister Kenny, and her struggles with the established order of medicine, is brought to mind is that licensed medical doctors all too often behave like members of a closed-shop union. In such an environment, no one is allowed to do work that is perceived as encroaching on their specialty, without consequent castigation and sanction. And, they vigorously lobby for laws to protect them from perceived interlopers.

In Sister Kenny’s case, she struggled for years to get her therapeutic methods accepted, even in the face of observable success, and admiring testimonials from patients. The medical profession cast aspersions on her methods and her person, largely because she wasn’t an accredited practitioner (only a nurse), and her methods contradicted generally accepted treatment standards.

In today’s contentious health care environment, alternative treatments are greatly frowned upon, and their practitioners ridiculed. Ask licensed doctors what they think of acupuncture, chiropractic, aroma or muscle activation therapy, and they will almost always turn up their noses. In fact, they have convinced the insurance industry that these methods are nothing more than palliatives bordering on quackery. Thus, patients are channeled into much more expensive surgical and drug treatments that often times provide no relief.

This is not to say that there aren’t quacks hovering around the practice of alternative medicine, just as there are quacks who are licensed to practice the approved variety. It is also not claimed that there alternative methods for all sicknesses or diseases. But it is also true that in most professions, wherever there is a buck to be made, a surfeit of willing hands will extend to accommodate. We see desperately sick people try all sorts of last gasp treatments, especially after traditional medicine has given up on them. And these alternative methods seldom work.

However, in the less well defined areas of pain management, due to a variety of causes, modern medicine has proven to be quite fallible. Countless thousands of people suffer through painful days of agony with only the promise of relief provided by dangerous drugs. Doctors prescribe many unproven medications because their pharmaceutical rep told them this was the cutting edge drug du jour for pain management. Big Pharma and the medical profession work hand and glove to push their latest (and expensive) drug on suffering patients. And since only licensed doctors can dispense them, this conduit is exploited by both parties. Why there might even be a financial incentive for the prescribing doctor. Heavens!

Because of the built-in aversion to examining or even testing alternative therapies, the healthcare system is saddled with more expensive, “accredited” treatments that push the insured patients in that direction.

Even though back surgery has been shown to be less than 50% effective, and much less costly alternative therapies have proven efficacious, they are ignored. Worse, just as in Sister Kenny’s case, they are scoffed at by the establishment. Such are the ironic side-effects of our costly for-profit health care system.

As another example of padding the bottom line is a practice that is becoming more common. Doctors are increasingly insisting on patients coming in for an office visit just to renew a prescription. Admittedly for some drugs it is necessary to monitor side effects (another indication of how dangerous some of them are), but in many cases it is totally unnecessary. As cuts in Medicare go into effect (which will increase, rather than cut costs), doctors will seek more ways to supplement their income. Once a professional is used to a certain level of earnings (no matter the discipline), it’s hard to accept less. Doctors are no exception.

So, the bottom line is that there just might be ways to improve both the costs

Healthcare System

Importance Of Technology In Healthcare System

Healthcare is a business today and like any other business the major motto is profit. But at the same time technological advances are required because until and unless the caregivers provide advanced technology and advanced result the patients will not trust them. In most of the countries healthcare is in private sector and the completion has only improved the standard. Use of technology is not only noticed in the use of advanced diagnostic and surgery machineries, but it is also noticed in the administrative system. People want things to be more professional and for that automated report generation, data maintenance, online registration and checking, and other facilities are enabled.

Different Sections Of Healthcare

Today, healthcare is not only limited to doctors and patients. Many new professions have developed in this industry and both the professional and the patients are taking advantage of them. Posts such as clinical assistant, nurse, nursing assistant, therapist, medicine supplier, administrative staff and many more have come in the existence. Each of them has enriched the industry in its own way. The education and qualification needed for each of them is different and people are earning a lot of money by getting involved in these jobs.

Cost Of Healthcare And Medical Insurances

The cost of healthcare is not the same in all healthcare systems around the world. In some countries healthcare is a privilege offered by the government to its people. The cost here is quite less and in many cases the industry comes under the public sector or is partially managed by public sector. But in some other countries the cost is high but thanks to the medical insurances available for the people there, it can be afforded by many people. It is seen that in the third world countries the cost is still out of the reach and as the literacy level is low, people don’t have much knowledge about insurances.

Scope Of Development In Healthcare

Though healthcare systems around the world has improved quite a lot in last few years, there are scopes of improvement still left in it. In some countries the technological advances can be accessed only by the rich. This is not a good sign because the poor are still suffering and dying. There are several researches carried out for finding medicine for life threatening diseases such as AIDs and cancer and in many cases success is achieved. A lot of investment was made for these researches. Though the good results are visible to the world the cost seems to be high. Healthcare system around the world is a growing sector of the market and as time will progress it will be enriched even more with new technique and new thoughts.